local government official at white board

By Tim Rahschulte, Ph.D, CEO, Professional Development Academy

One key lesson to learn about goal setting is that it’s an exercise in trade-offs and priorities. Each of our decisions is a trade-off of one thing over another or the timing of all things being considered. You’ve probably heard something like this before: you can have anything, just not everything—or at least not everything all at once. You can have ice cream…but only after you eat your broccoli. This is a huge trade-off for a young person. The trades don’t get any easier as you get older. There are financial trade-offs, career trade-offs, and many other life trade-offs. Whether you can explain opportunity cost in economic terms or not, we all can recognize that there are trade-offs involved in every decision we make. That’s life. It’s also a major function of cybersecurity leadership.

Choose What Not to Do

Life is a number of alternative decisions sacrificed. Every benefit is at the expense of a competing benefit. Understanding your priorities and trade-offs means understanding what you’re not going to do. Michael Porter, a Harvard Business School professor and prolific author on strategy, said, “The essence of strategy is choosing what not to do.” Many organizations and people within organizations struggle with choosing, period, let alone being specifically intentional about what to do and, importantly, what not to do. It’s easy to get bogged down by the decision or to take on too many things all at once and avoid the decision to choose at all. When you don’t choose what not to do, you can find yourself adrift when it comes to your personal vision and confused when it comes to effectively establishing a position on anything. If you’re not consciously choosing what to do and what not to do, you’re likely open to try anything; worse yet, you might try to take on everything. That’s not good. So make a decision—that’s an important part of this rule and lesson. No vision is ever achieved when it’s focused on everything.

The best leaders know their capacity to perform. Some know they can manage three priorities really well. For others, that number may be eight, and for still others only two. What they also know is that when they take on one more than they can truly manage, it’s not only the last one that suffers; rather, all the priorities they’re trying to manage will suffer. John Marcante, the chief information officer at Vanguard, can shed a lot of light on effective leadership and achieving personal success and management of priorities. One of his guiding mantras is “I’d rather move three balls a mile than 30 balls an inch.” Similarly, Jim Collins, author of Good to Great and Great by Choice, said, “If you have more than three priorities, then you don’t have any.” This stands as a reminder of the importance of making trade-offs and managing priorities. If you’re going to succeed, you’ve got to prioritize. If you’re not consciously choosing what to do and what not to do, the three balls you should be focused on moving a mile likely will never get much farther than an inch.

Have a 'Most-Important List'

What three balls must move a mile for your vision to be realized? Prioritize the three things you’ve got to absolutely get right. As you do, be sure to differentiate between the entire to-do list and the most important list. Follow the advice from Brian Engle, the executive director at the Retail Cyber Intelligence Sharing Center, who said, “Focus on the things that are most important, not just those things that you may be most equipped for. Lean into the challenges, especially those outside your comfort zone.” This is a great reminder that sometimes we have to stop doing the things we are most comfortable doing so that we can start doing the things that matter the most.

We all know that our daily routine involves a number of tasks and activities that don’t share the same level of priority. As you go about moving the three most important balls a mile, you may also want to heed the advice from Joshua Beeman, the executive director and information security officer at the University of Pennsylvania: “The main thing is keeping the main thing the main thing. Don’t get distracted. Stay on point. Those who succeed are those who make incremental progress every day on the main thing.” Devote your time, attention, energy, and strengths to your highest priorities and trade off all other efforts. In other words, focus on what matters the most, and ignore everything else.

Find out more about the ICMA Cybersecurity Leadership Academy. This 12-week online course delivers the leadership tools you need to help keep your local government secure.

 

Registration open.

Overview

12-week online course delivers the leadership tools you need to help keep your local government secure.

ICMA has partnered with the Professional Development Academy to offer a program in leading local government cybersecurity initiatives.

This is a 12-week mentorship based collaborative readiness program led by CISOs and other experts who deliver their proven frameworks and insights on how to lead and secure a network and an organization – protecting data assets and the enterprise brand. This program coaches participants on what it means to think and act as a cybersecurity leader.

Who should attend?

Existing and emerging front-line and mid-level leaders interested in improving their cybersecurity capabilities, team engagement, and organizational outcomes.  In addition to IT professionals, this program may also work well for cyber organizational partners in finance, operations, HR, and other disciplines who are interested in learning more about cybersecurity leadership and overall organizational risk management.

The course, limited to no more than 50 participants.

Upcoming Cohorts 

April 20, 2020

August 3, 2020

Course Fee

The retail cost is $1,995 per participant. ICMA offers a member scholarship of $300 per participant, which makes the cost $1,695. Non-members will receive a $200 scholarship making the cost $1,795.

Visit the website for more information.

 

Event Details

    When

  • Apr 20, 2020 - Nov 02, 2020
  • 09:00 am 12:36 pm
  • Registration Deadline: 09/03/2020

    Price

  • Member Price:$1695.00
  • Non-Member:$1795.00

ICMA has partnered with the Professional Development Academy to offer a pilot program in leading local government cybersecurity initiatives.

The course, limited to no more than 50 participants. This document is the calendar for each module.

Course Module Dates:

MODULES 1 – 5: January 6 – 27

MODULES 6 – 9: February 10 – March 2

MODULES 10 – 12: March 16 – April 6

 

Register at https://www.pdaleadership.com/icma

 

VIA Adobe Stock

ICMA has partnered with the Professional Development Academy to offer a pilot program in leading local government cybersecurity initiatives.

The course, limited to no more than 50 participants:

MODULES 1 – 5: January 6 – 27

MODULES 6 – 9: February 10 – March 2

MODULES 10 – 12: March 16 – April 6

Course Calendar              REGISTER TODAY

 

What is ICMA Cybersecurity Leadership Program?

A 12-week mentorship based collaborative readiness program led by CISOs and other experts who deliver their proven frameworks and insights on how to lead and secure a network and an organization – protecting data assets and the enterprise brand. This program coaches participants on what it means to think and act as a cybersecurity leader.

READ THE FAQS

As ICMA’s research has demonstrated, local governments of all sizes are susceptible to cyberthreats and must actively prepare for these threats with cybersecurity investments. This leadership development program prepares existing and emerging leaders to better defend their most critical assets.
— MARC OTT, ICMA Executive Director

 

What are the objectives of the program?

KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITIES GAP COMPETENCY CISO EXPECTATIONS
LEADING AND MAKING DECISIONS LEADING Execute as a (local government) leader to facilitate, influence, persuade, and negotiate with individuals, teams and groups toward decisions
PLANNING AND MANAGING CHANGE ADAPTING Leverage the power of systems thinking to mitigate risk and empower people during organizational and market fluctuation
BUILDING STRONG RELATIONSHIPS COLLABORATING Establish alignment of individual purpose with team meaning and organizational mission to energize efforts and maximize results
PRESENTING INFORMATION CLEARLY COMMUNICATING Manage messaging based on stakeholder need, sensemaking, and simplicity to create clarity in meaning, confidence, and community
EXECUTING TO ACHIEVE VALUE FOR YOUR COMMUNITY DELIVERING VALUE Focus on projects and processes (and the people associated with them) while linking execution to strategy to deliver value to community

 

How is the program structured?  

With intentionally designed asynchronous and synchronous activities and rich content and application-focused outcomes, the program takes a whole-solution approach to cybersecurity leadership rather than a focus on siloed activities. You can find the complete course breakdown here. 

DOWNLOAD THE CALENDAR

Here is a list of program activities:

  • Breakout Group Meeting – 60-minute meeting (in-person or virtual) amongst breakout group members (typically 10-12 participants).
  • Breakout Group Summary – These posts are for the rest of the cohort to see what your breakout group discussed. Each week your breakout group’s designated leader or scribe will write this post which will be seen by the entire cohort.
  • Discuss with Breakout Group – Share your thoughts, perspectives and comments with your breakout group. These will be seen by you, your breakout group, and faculty.
  • Discuss with Cohort – Share your thoughts, perspectives and comments with your cohort. This is an online threaded discussion and you are expected to engage in with your colleagues. Posts will be seen by all participants and faculty.
  • Live Event – 60-minute, virtual meeting conducted via web conference with your entire cohort and facilitated by your faculty mentor.
  • Read – Read a document, case study or article.
  • Reflect – Your online reflections are your private notes and thoughts. They will only be seen by you.
  • Surveys or assessments –  You will also receive occasional surveys on the platform for you to answer questions and submit responses that will help you shape your own learning journey and provide us valuable feedback to shape future courses.
  • Watch – View a brief video from your faculty presenters.  

 

How does the ICMA Cybersecurity Leadership Program compare to other cybersecurity programs?

What keeps you up at night?

WATCH MORE VIDEOS

  ICMA Cyber Program University Training Boot Camp Program Technical Training
Scalable    
Cost Effective    
Mentorship Based Training    
Online      
CPE Credits Certfied
Non-disruptive      
Relevant Content  
Fully Integrated Leadership Solution      
Expertly Facilitated by PhD    
Capstone Simulated Attack    

 

Who Should Attend?

Existing and emerging front-line and mid-level leaders interested in improving their cybersecurity capabilities, team engagement, and organizational outcomes.  In addition to IT professionals, this program may also work well for cyber organizational partners in finance, operations, HR, and other disciplines who are interested in learning more about cybersecurity leadership and overall organizational risk management.

 

What is the Cost of the Program?

  RETAIL ICMA MEMBERS NON-MEMBERS
PRICE $1,995 $1,695 $1,795

The retail cost is $1,995 per participant. ICMA offers a member scholarship of $300 per participant, which makes the cost $1,695. Non-members will receive a $200 scholarship making the cost $1,795.

 

Can I count this toward my ICMA Credentialed Manager status?

Yes. ICMA will allow 48 credit hours for this program. In addition, completion of this course can be applied to other credentialing programs--for example SHRM, PMI, and CISSP.

 

Next Steps...

Whether you'd like more specific information about the program, or you're ready to register now, your next stop is the program registration page.

REGISTER NOW

Marc A. Ott, city manager of Austin, Texas, has been selected by the ICMA Executive Board as the organization’s next executive director.  Ott will assume his new position on October 31, 2016.

"Marc brings to ICMA nearly 30 years of distinguished service in the local government management profession and has been a member of ICMA throughout his career. His broad local government experience includes service to a number of very diverse communities in Texas and Michigan.” stated Patricia Martel, ICMA Executive Board President and city manager of Daly City, California. 

“In making this appointment, following a year-long competitive search, the board selected a candidate who reflects the integrity, professionalism, and commitment to service of our entire organization, which has been a hallmark of ICMA's leadership," Martel noted. "Marc is a reflection of our members’ dedication to local government service and most importantly to the ethics of our profession.  ICMA, our membership, and our staff will be well served by Marc Ott's leadership," said Martel.

Ott currently serves as the city manager of Austin, Texas, a full-service city with 40+ departments, 14,000 employees, an all-funds budget of $3.7 billion, and a AAA bond rating that was maintained throughout his tenure.  He has held this position since January 2008. During his nearly nine years as chief executive and chief administrative officer, Ott has championed employee empowerment, civic dialogue, innovation, and fiscal sustainability with the goal of having Austin recognized as the "Best Managed City in America."

Since his arrival in Austin, Ott has received numerous awards and honors.  In 2011, he was one of only six senior public sector administrators worldwide—including Los Angeles, Chicago, Las Vegas, Vienna (Austria) and Melbourne (Australia)—that were highlighted for their exceptional local management practices in the CAO Chronicles of Public Sector Digest

In 2013, Ott was recognized with ICMA’s highest professional honor, the Award for Career Excellence in Memory of Mark E. Keane, for his creative approach to such challenging issues as budget deficits, homelessness, infrastructure management, and education. Ott’s insistence that “a good idea is a good idea, regardless of where it comes from,” was put in to practice early in his tenure with Austin, as the city faced a $30 million budget gap which, if left uncorrected, most likely would have persisted over time. Through a creative combination of employee-generated cost savings, thoughtful service reductions, strategic infrastructure investing, and unprecedented public involvement, Ott and his team navigated the fiscal challenge without laying off a single employee.

Also in 2013, Ott and the city of Austin received ICMA’s Community Sustainability Award, which recognizes innovative local government programs that creatively balance a community’s social, economic, environmental, and cultural needs. The city was cited for its Austin Energy Green Building program, a rating system initially designed for single-family homes that expanded to include multifamily and commercial buildings.

In Ott’s tenure as city manager, Austin has consistently been recognized by the ETC Institute as one of the best cities in America for municipal service delivery, exceeding the national average in almost every public service category. In 2013, Austin was ranked number one among 13 cities with populations over 500,000, and continues to garner top marks in community satisfaction rates when compared to other large cities in the country.

Earlier this year, Forbes magazine ranked the city of Austin #22 in a list of “America’s Best Employers,” joining other Top-25 winners that included Google, Costco, Facebook, Southwest Airlines, and Duke University.  Additionally, Austin was the top-ranked employer in the government sector for organizations with 5,000 or more employees.

“I am excited about the opportunity to serve and lead America’s premier local government organization, one that is supremely dedicated to excellence in local governance around the world,” said Ott. “I am proud to say that I’ve been a member of ICMA for over 30 years. The mission, values, and code of conduct espoused by ICMA serves its members, and the communities they serve, very well.  This is a time of great change, and it is essential that ICMA be at the forefront in helping to shape the future of local government,” he added.

Ott has had a long and distinguished career in municipal management. Before joining Austin, he served as assistant city manager for infrastructure services for Fort Worth, Texas (2002–08), where he was responsible for the infrastructure operations carried out by the Water, Transportation and Public Works, Engineering, and Aviation departments. He was also responsible for implementing one of the city council's top strategic priorities: promoting orderly growth.

Prior to moving to Texas, Ott served as city administrator of Rochester Hills, Michigan (1998–2002), where he had administrative and managerial oversight over all municipal operations. He also served as city manager (1993–97), deputy city manager (1991–93), and as an assistant city manager (1990–91) in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Ott served in leadership and support roles for the cities of Grand Rapids and Jackson, Michigan (1982–90), and as a staff assistant to the Michigan Municipal League (1981–82).

Ott earned his bachelor's degree in management with a concentration in economics from Michigan's Oakland University and a master's in public administration from the same university. He is also a graduate of the Senior Executives in State and Local Government program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and serves on the board of directors for the Alliance for Innovation. Ott received an ICMA Service Award in 2012 in honor of his 30 years of service to local government.

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